Newsletter #64 – Freedom Forum Part II

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The First Amendment Center’s non-profit status has been revoked for failure to file 990s for three years.  Could this be the reason why the reference now is the “Freedom Forum First Amendment Center”?  Whether due to deliberate or forced reorganization, the First Amendment Center (the Center) and the Religious Freedom Education Project (the Project), have expanded their reach by collaborating with organizations such as Unity Productions Foundation, the Council on Islamic Education (CIE) and the Islamic Networks Group (ING).

The Muslim Brotherhood is as much about an ideological plan for the U.S. as it is about individual relationships and the organizations that have come together to work toward these ideological objectives.

Unity Productions Foundation (UPF)

The Freedom Forum’s Newseum and Religious Freedom Education Project director Charles Haynes recently collaborated with UPF to promote the “What is the truth about Islam and Muslims in America?” initiative. More about this initiative will be discussed in Part IV.

Pakistani IT billionaire Safi Qureshey is the founder and Chairman of the UPF Board.  UPF claims that its mission is to “…create peace through the media.”

The public faces of UPF are executive producers and Muslim converts Alex Kronemer and Michael Wolfe.  Kronemer has a “special” connection to Tennessee and Rutherford County; he is married to Lobna Luby Ismail, founder of Connecting Cultures, the organization contracted by the U.S. Department of Justice that trained school personnel from the Rutherford County and Murfreesboro school districts about respecting Islam.

Connecting Culture’s work in Tennessee has been covered extensively by www.dailyrollcall.com.

UPF is part of the U.S. Muslim propaganda campaign and markets its products to mass media such as PBS.  And as with all Muslim propaganda disseminating organizations, UPF also targets teachers.  UPF also promotes the  “20,000 Dialogues” project paired with yet another project titled “Change the Story”, which includes the standard Muslim Brotherhood entourage – ISNA, CAIR and MSA among others.  Each one of these initiatives singly and collectively, deceptively revises and whitewashes facts and history.  Daniel Greenfield has helped peel the onion in this regard here and here.

The First Amendment Center and the Council on Islamic Education (CIE)

In 2000 Charles Haynes on behalf of the First Amendment Center, collaborated with the CIE to publish “Teaching About Religion in National and State Social Studies Standards”.  Newsletter #49 discusses the CIE, its principal researcher Susan Douglass, and how they are transforming what is taught about Islam in U.S. public schools.

According to a 2008 entry posted on The American Muslim website, Safi Qureshey has been a generous funder of CIE:  “Shabbir Mansuri of the Council on Islamic Education, now the Institute on Religion and Public Life, over the course of twenty years, has rewritten the required textbooks on religion for 37 of America’s fifty states, thanks to unlimited funding by America’s first homegrown Muslim billionnaire, Safi Qureshey.”

Saghir Aslam is another Pakistani philanthropist who helped launch and financially support the CIE.  Aslam lays claim to having been instrumental in “helping to launch a number of national American Muslim organizations, including the Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC)” and “facilitating the establishment” of CAIR.  The Muslim Observer reported that Aslam is close to the Muslim Brotherhood’s Islamic Circle of North America (ICNA), having been authorized at one time to “oversee an ICNA bank account.” Aslam is also one of the founding members of the Islamic Society of Orange County, which in 1981 hired Muzammil Siddiqui to be the Religious Director, a position he still holds.

Saghir Aslam has other things in common with Safi Quereshey.

In addition to both being very wealthy Pakistani philanthropists living in the U.S., both men have supported the growth of Muslim Brotherhood ideology in the U.S.  In addition to their involvement with CIE, both men appear acquainted with Muzammil Siddiqui whose resume is replete with Muslim Brotherhood organizational associations including serving as the president of ISNA for several years and chair of NAIT’s board.  Siddiqui has plenty of examples to his credit to qualify him as a pro-jihad, pro-Sharia, anti-American, hard core Islamist.

While Siddiqui was still president of ISNA[1], Quereshey moderated a 2001 ISNA conference panel.  This was the same conference that hosted al-Qaeda leader Anwar Awlaki and promoted Islamic charities that were shut down due to ties to al-Qaeda.[2]  Aslam was a founding member of the Islamic Society of Orange County which hired Siddiqui to be the Religious Director.

Given the close involvement both personally and financially of principals Quereshey and Aslam with some of the main Muslim Brotherhood organizations, it would not be a stretch to suggest that Quereshey and Aslam’s endeavors are in furtherance of the “grand jihad from within” articulated in the 1991 Muslim Brotherhood memorandum.

Charles Haynes and the Islamic Networks Group (ING)

Added to the First Amendment Center’s collaboration with outside Islamist organizations, Charles Haynes is an ING Board member.  Newsletter #41 explains in greater detail the Muslim Brotherhood organizations which ING claims close relationships and working partnerships.

In August 2012, the Tennessee AMAC signed on as the newest ING affiliate.


[1] ISNA’s founding members included not only members of the Muslim Brotherhood’s MSA, but also Sami al-Arian who was convicted and deported for his leadership of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ). See Newsletter #39 regarding the relationship between Sami Al-Arian and Tennessee’s Dr. Ali’s Jerusalem Fund. It was also proven during that Holy Land Foundation terror financing trial that ISNA maintained a fund which raised money for Hamas.

[2] Organizations promoted during the humanitarian relief session at the 2001 conference included, Benevolence International Foundation (first shut down in 1993 in Saudi Arabia over concerns about its ties to al-Qaeda and subsequently banned worldwide by the UN Security Council), Global Relief Foundation (shut down by U.S. government in 2001 for terrorist funding including al-Qaeda), LIFE for Relief and Development (raided by FBI and IRS in 2006. LIFE lists the Jerusalem Fund as a partner organization).


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